ODB 2 3 Focus Questions

This is where Jason's ICC students should come to post their second homework assignment.

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Jason M. Ham
Posts: 669
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2004 1:35 pm
Location: Yeokgok, Bucheon, South Korea

ODB 2 3 Focus Questions

Post by Jason M. Ham » Sat Mar 26, 2011 12:45 am

Hello everyone. This week we are reading about Sook, a Korean-American girl and her experience living in another culture. Her father shares with her some words of wisdom that we can all benefit from. There is also some great information about culture, its definitions, its connection to behavior, and so on. Try to get into the reading and let us know if its more enjoyable than Brown 8)
Also remember to answer the 3 focus questions on the third page of the handout. Please reply to this thread and answer them in your own words. For question number three, try not to post the same information as another user. Scan your classmates' posts and try to come up with new and fresh ideas. Finally, remember to reply to other users in the Discussing Culture forum twice. This will promote more discussion and keep the threads going strong. :)
1. What is culture?
2. How does culture relate to behavior?
3. What can you tell us about the unique culture you are a part of?

ICC steve
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:32 am

Korea's room culture

Post by ICC steve » Sun Mar 27, 2011 4:30 am

Culture includes tastes and manners that are favored by a particular social group. Every country has its own unique culture that reflects its national characteristics. For example, throughout history, Koreans have generally preferred closed spaces. In the past, most Korean homes had a spare room for guests in which social activities took place. This custom contributed to the development of a room culture, which most Koreans enjoy now. The so-called “bang” or room culture has become an irresistible trend in Korea.
The first kind of room to gain popularity is the “noraebang” or singing room. It is a small, soundproof room available for rent. For about 10,000 won per hour, people rent a singing room with TV screens . When they sing out loud, accompanied by dancing, especially after they have had a drink or two, they are most likely to feel intimate with their group. Within this private space, they can avoid the stares of strangers and find their own pleasure. In addition, noraebang is a good place where people can share group identity. Koreans, who value group identity, regard noraebang as a social space to make their personal boundary bigger, resulting in an increased sense of belonging to their group.
The second trend is the “pc bang” or pc café. Koreans’ preference for closed spaces led to the appearance of the pc bang. While pc bangs began with the healthy intention of providing high speedy access to information and downloads, the pc bang owners had trouble making ends meet. In the meantime, they started to change their goals towards providing online games. Released in the United States, Starcraft was a crucial factor in the explosive spread of the pc bang. Now the pc bang is a closed and personal space where only the young generations indulge in online games.
To sum up, Koreans have a tendency to enjoy themselves in private spaces. This kind of trait gave birth to their unique “room culture”.

ICC Jisu
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:30 am

Korean People and Culture

Post by ICC Jisu » Mon Mar 28, 2011 1:31 am

Culture is everything shared by any group of people. In inlcudes their behaviors, ways of thinking, values, and so on. It is the way of life which has been formed throughout a long time in a community. So as we grow and learn from our parents and older people, we accordingly follow their bahviors and thoughts. I'd like to talk about Korean impatience. This is quite new cultural aspect in Korea(not generated from prehistoric times). When a lot of foreigners come to Korea, the first phrase they learn is probably "Hurry up!" We run after the bus when we are about to miss it. We begin to cross the street when the traffic light turns yello or it's still red. We click out of a web site if it takes more than 5 seconds or so to open. Even though these cannot be the cases for every Korean, most of you might agree with them. I think this impatience is rooted on the industrialization in 20c. Korea had developed so fast and people also got out of financial difficulties quickly. A rapid economic growth might have resulted in national impatience. But, on the positive side,thanks to the nationality we have the fastest access to the Internet in the world. :D

ICC Jisu
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:30 am

Re: Korea's room culture

Post by ICC Jisu » Mon Mar 28, 2011 1:35 am

ICC steve wrote:Culture includes tastes and manners that are favored by a particular social group. Every country has its own unique culture that reflects its national characteristics. For example, throughout history, Koreans have generally preferred closed spaces. In the past, most Korean homes had a spare room for guests in which social activities took place. This custom contributed to the development of a room culture, which most Koreans enjoy now. The so-called “bang” or room culture has become an irresistible trend in Korea.
The first kind of room to gain popularity is the “noraebang” or singing room. It is a small, soundproof room available for rent. For about 10,000 won per hour, people rent a singing room with TV screens . When they sing out loud, accompanied by dancing, especially after they have had a drink or two, they are most likely to feel intimate with their group. Within this private space, they can avoid the stares of strangers and find their own pleasure. In addition, noraebang is a good place where people can share group identity. Koreans, who value group identity, regard noraebang as a social space to make their personal boundary bigger, resulting in an increased sense of belonging to their group.
The second trend is the “pc bang” or pc café. Koreans’ preference for closed spaces led to the appearance of the pc bang. While pc bangs began with the healthy intention of providing high speedy access to information and downloads, the pc bang owners had trouble making ends meet. In the meantime, they started to change their goals towards providing online games. Released in the United States, Starcraft was a crucial factor in the explosive spread of the pc bang. Now the pc bang is a closed and personal space where only the young generations indulge in online games.
To sum up, Koreans have a tendency to enjoy themselves in private spaces. This kind of trait gave birth to their unique “room culture”.


I really enjoyed your article. It is very interesting that Koreans have their own room culture. In Noraebang, people show totally different personalities that they didn't usually reveal. I think that might be one of ways getting out of their streesed daily life.

ICC steve
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:32 am

Re: Korean People and Culture

Post by ICC steve » Mon Mar 28, 2011 6:51 am

ICC Jisu wrote:Culture is everything shared by any group of people. In inlcudes their behaviors, ways of thinking, values, and so on. It is the way of life which has been formed throughout a long time in a community. So as we grow and learn from our parents and older people, we accordingly follow their bahviors and thoughts. I'd like to talk about Korean impatience. This is quite new cultural aspect in Korea(not generated from prehistoric times). When a lot of foreigners come to Korea, the first phrase they learn is probably "Hurry up!" We run after the bus when we are about to miss it. We begin to cross the street when the traffic light turns yello or it's still red. We click out of a web site if it takes more than 5 seconds or so to open. Even though these cannot be the cases for every Korean, most of you might agree with them. I think this impatience is rooted on the industrialization in 20c. Korea had developed so fast and people also got out of financial difficulties quickly. A rapid economic growth might have resulted in national impatience. But, on the positive side,thanks to the nationality we have the fastest access to the Internet in the world. :D

Thanks for your compliments. I totally agree with you. The culture of '빨리 빨리' must be rooted in the process of industrialization of our country in a short period. I like that culture. I'd like to point out the benefits of the culture. We are in the economic recession. Lots of jobs have disappeared, but it is true that the tendency of 'hurry up' has created lots of jobs thankfully such as 'quick service', and 'quick delivery', etc. Look around you. There are tons of peole involved in quick services.

ICC kyoung a
Posts: 23
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 4:57 am

Korea's food culture

Post by ICC kyoung a » Mon Mar 28, 2011 2:20 pm

Culture is a huge concept. When I hear the word culture, I usually think about food. I would like to talk about food culture. Every country has its own unique food culture. We have a bunch of different foods in Korea that are intended to have positive effects on one's health. Dogs meat is one of them. The dog meat stew is called boshintang, and it is known to enhance one's energy level and even stamina. Many Westerners may be shocked that koreans eat dog, but it has been a part of Korean culture for hundreds of years. And there is a common breed of dogs that are eaten, which are normally grown on farms. It is not like we eat pet dogs we raise at home. Also other cultures eat exotic things that Koreans don't eat. I think that we could understand the culture of each other better if we learn cultures through various food culture.
Last edited by ICC kyoung a on Tue Mar 29, 2011 12:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

ICC kyoung a
Posts: 23
Joined: Sun Mar 06, 2011 4:57 am

Re: Korea's room culture

Post by ICC kyoung a » Mon Mar 28, 2011 3:37 pm

ICC steve wrote:Culture includes tastes and manners that are favored by a particular social group. Every country has its own unique culture that reflects its national characteristics. For example, throughout history, Koreans have generally preferred closed spaces. In the past, most Korean homes had a spare room for guests in which social activities took place. This custom contributed to the development of a room culture, which most Koreans enjoy now. The so-called “bang” or room culture has become an irresistible trend in Korea.
The first kind of room to gain popularity is the “noraebang” or singing room. It is a small, soundproof room available for rent. For about 10,000 won per hour, people rent a singing room with TV screens . When they sing out loud, accompanied by dancing, especially after they have had a drink or two, they are most likely to feel intimate with their group. Within this private space, they can avoid the stares of strangers and find their own pleasure. In addition, noraebang is a good place where people can share group identity. Koreans, who value group identity, regard noraebang as a social space to make their personal boundary bigger, resulting in an increased sense of belonging to their group.
The second trend is the “pc bang” or pc café. Koreans’ preference for closed spaces led to the appearance of the pc bang. While pc bangs began with the healthy intention of providing high speedy access to information and downloads, the pc bang owners had trouble making ends meet. In the meantime, they started to change their goals towards providing online games. Released in the United States, Starcraft was a crucial factor in the explosive spread of the pc bang. Now the pc bang is a closed and personal space where only the young generations indulge in online games.
To sum up, Koreans have a tendency to enjoy themselves in private spaces. This kind of trait gave birth to their unique “room culture”.
I totally agree with you. I also enjoy room culture like jjimjilbang, when some of people were stiff and sore they go to jjimjilbang. We can watch TV or movies there. There are also some designated quiet rooms where one can catch a few Zs. I think that room culture like jjimjilbang is a good way to relax our daily life.

ICCseonhee
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:08 am

Re: ODB 2 3 Focus Questions

Post by ICCseonhee » Wed Mar 30, 2011 11:45 am

I think Culture is made from the selected outgrowth which is composed with values, beliefs and efforts what the same races got through experiences. Therefore it makes poeple to think it as the way of `normal' or `natural' and `right'. so people often react or behave to situations instrintively and unconsciously without knowing that our culture is sometimes intolerant. Your culture, of course,is helpful to live your life if you pick out good ones and adapt to yourself.
In my culture there is something about `postnatal care'. Most of pregnant women in the world do something to recover their body after childbirth. Many korean too.But there are some differences from others.We have many intructions to observe- that is- Mothers have to keep warm themselves(Do not drink or touch every cold things and do not take a shower..), lie down as possible as they can, eat health-foods and so on...These are our postnatal-care culture. Many foreigners even though some koreans may not be able to understand this culture. But even if some of them are unnecessary things, it must be positive moral culture to protect mothers.

ICC_MyungYeon
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:06 am

Re: ODB 2 3 Focus Questions

Post by ICC_MyungYeon » Thu Mar 31, 2011 2:15 pm

I think the culture is people' base to live. I mean that the culture is effeted everthing for people such as living way , general moral even food.
Those elements make the standard rule to follow people. So people could follow the major culture which most people do.
Regarding Korean unique culture, I'd like to talk " respective way".
For exampe, Korean has various respective expression to talk. As many people know that once Korean young people meet older people, we have to use resfective language called "Jondeakmal".Becauce young people think older people know more than them and could teach them based on thire experience.
So we do that as a part of respective way.
Plus, once korean young people meet the elderly on the subway, they are automatically stand up and ask to sit their seat instead of them.
Becasue young people cares about the elderly who are older and weaker than them. It is a kind of respective way to express.It is not just for elderly.
It could be for pregnant women and disabled people. Actually this is not a obiligation but we are following it as a part of our culture.
Nowadays, this situations are deceasing , Because I think many korean go to abroad to have many culture expeerience. So they could be effected from that.
but It is still existed. I hope, korean's respective way should be existed longer as a good case . ^^

ICC_MyungYeon
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:06 am

Re: Korea's room culture

Post by ICC_MyungYeon » Thu Mar 31, 2011 2:24 pm

ICC steve wrote:Culture includes tastes and manners that are favored by a particular social group. Every country has its own unique culture that reflects its national characteristics. For example, throughout history, Koreans have generally preferred closed spaces. In the past, most Korean homes had a spare room for guests in which social activities took place. This custom contributed to the development of a room culture, which most Koreans enjoy now. The so-called “bang” or room culture has become an irresistible trend in Korea.
The first kind of room to gain popularity is the “noraebang” or singing room. It is a small, soundproof room available for rent. For about 10,000 won per hour, people rent a singing room with TV screens . When they sing out loud, accompanied by dancing, especially after they have had a drink or two, they are most likely to feel intimate with their group. Within this private space, they can avoid the stares of strangers and find their own pleasure. In addition, noraebang is a good place where people can share group identity. Koreans, who value group identity, regard noraebang as a social space to make their personal boundary bigger, resulting in an increased sense of belonging to their group.
The second trend is the “pc bang” or pc café. Koreans’ preference for closed spaces led to the appearance of the pc bang. While pc bangs began with the healthy intention of providing high speedy access to information and downloads, the pc bang owners had trouble making ends meet. In the meantime, they started to change their goals towards providing online games. Released in the United States, Starcraft was a crucial factor in the explosive spread of the pc bang. Now the pc bang is a closed and personal space where only the young generations indulge in online games.
To sum up, Koreans have a tendency to enjoy themselves in private spaces. This kind of trait gave birth to their unique “room culture”.
I also think about it as a korean unique culture called " bang culture" . Nowadays young people want to have their space individulally.That's why we could find out "Bang" very easily to accept their trend demand.

ICC eunjeong
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:46 am

Re: ODB 2 3 Focus Questions

Post by ICC eunjeong » Thu Mar 31, 2011 2:35 pm

Culture is a learned pattern of behavior and ways in which people live their lives. Culture is essential for the existence of a society, because it binds people together. People learn culture from their family and surroundings and so on. They are brought up in a culture different from that in which they were born and imbibe the culture of the society where they grow up.
A few days ago, I heard about a cultural difference from my friend. When a man has a date with a woman, a man sometimes cuts steak and gives it to a woman because he wants to show his friendly manner to her. It is natural behavior in Korea, but it is not understandable in America. Americans think this behavior means that a man treats a woman like a child.
For another example, when you eat food, you shouldn’t make a sound in Korea. Korean people believe that you lose your luck if you eat food making a sound. However, you should make a sound in Japan. Japanese people think it means the food is very delicious.
There are a number of cultural differences in the world or society where we live. I think we should try to know and understand them and to not make a mistake.
I think one of unique Korean cultures is the body scrubbing culture. Only in Korea, you can see a body-scrubber in the public bathhouse. Scrubbing your body does give you a smoother skin since you scrub away dead skin cells and exfoliates your body, and even wash away your stress. So foreigners who are just used to showers are now getting addicted to body scrubbing. Especially, Many Japanese people visit to Korea to experience this body scrubbing culture.
Last edited by ICC eunjeong on Fri Apr 01, 2011 3:12 am, edited 3 times in total.

ICC eunjeong
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:46 am

Re: ODB 2 3 Focus Questions

Post by ICC eunjeong » Thu Mar 31, 2011 3:00 pm

ICCseonhee wrote:I think Culture is made from the selected outgrowth which is composed with values, beliefs and efforts what the same races got through experiences. Therefore it makes poeple to think it as the way of `normal' or `natural' and `right'. so people often react or behave to situations instrintively and unconsciously without knowing that our culture is sometimes intolerant. Your culture, of course,is helpful to live your life if you pick out good ones and adapt to yourself.
In my culture there is something about `postnatal care'. Most of pregnant women in the world do something to recover their body after childbirth. Many korean too.But there are some differences from others.We have many intructions to observe- that is- Mothers have to keep warm themselves(Do not drink or touch every cold things and do not take a shower..), lie down as possible as they can, eat health-foods and so on...These are our postnatal-care culture. Many foreigners even though some koreans may not be able to understand this culture. But even if some of them are unnecessary things, it must be positive moral culture to protect mothers.

I agree with you. When I gave birth to my son, I tried to recover my health as you mentioned. And I also ate seaweed soup(mi-yeok-gook) and even drank boiled soup with a pork hock many times to produce much mother's milk for my baby. Personally, I hope you will give birth to your baby well and maintain good your and your baby's health.

ICC Seunghyun
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:14 am

Re: ODB 2 3 Focus Questions

Post by ICC Seunghyun » Thu Mar 31, 2011 4:13 pm

Culture could be part of me and my life . I think we have many titles instead of name. I call my relatives emo,gomo,samchon not their names. I didn’t know their names before I was concerned about it. Now I became someone’s emo,gomo. I feel comfortable when my nephew call me gomo. There is a tiny minor problem with my sister in law’s husband and me because we don’t know how call each other. I asked relatives but they also didn’t know what is the right title for each other. So sister in law’s husband and me don’t call each other or avoid the situation that have to call each other. It’s kind of awkward. Moreover ,in case of woman, if a woman get married and have a baby, she is going to lost her name. then , she just call ‘mom’ or ‘baby’s mom’. I think mom feel happy when someone call baby’s mom’. As going old, people likes calling their title that shows the authority. I think calling title looks sometimes prescriptive. But it’s our long history culture.

ICC Seunghyun
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:14 am

Re: Korea's room culture

Post by ICC Seunghyun » Thu Mar 31, 2011 4:16 pm

ICC steve wrote:Culture includes tastes and manners that are favored by a particular social group. Every country has its own unique culture that reflects its national characteristics. For example, throughout history, Koreans have generally preferred closed spaces. In the past, most Korean homes had a spare room for guests in which social activities took place. This custom contributed to the development of a room culture, which most Koreans enjoy now. The so-called “bang” or room culture has become an irresistible trend in Korea.
The first kind of room to gain popularity is the “noraebang” or singing room. It is a small, soundproof room available for rent. For about 10,000 won per hour, people rent a singing room with TV screens . When they sing out loud, accompanied by dancing, especially after they have had a drink or two, they are most likely to feel intimate with their group. Within this private space, they can avoid the stares of strangers and find their own pleasure. In addition, noraebang is a good place where people can share group identity. Koreans, who value group identity, regard noraebang as a social space to make their personal boundary bigger, resulting in an increased sense of belonging to their group.
The second trend is the “pc bang” or pc café. Koreans’ preference for closed spaces led to the appearance of the pc bang. While pc bangs began with the healthy intention of providing high speedy access to information and downloads, the pc bang owners had trouble making ends meet. In the meantime, they started to change their goals towards providing online games. Released in the United States, Starcraft was a crucial factor in the explosive spread of the pc bang. Now the pc bang is a closed and personal space where only the young generations indulge in online games.
To sum up, Koreans have a tendency to enjoy themselves in private spaces. This kind of trait gave birth to their unique “room culture”.


your story is interesting. what 'bang' culture will come next? :wink:

ICC eunjeong
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:46 am

Re: ODB 2 3 Focus Questions

Post by ICC eunjeong » Thu Mar 31, 2011 5:06 pm

ICC Seunghyun wrote:Culture could be part of me and my life . I think we have many titles instead of name. I call my relatives emo,gomo,samchon not their names. I didn’t know their names before I was concerned about it. Now I became someone’s emo,gomo. I feel comfortable when my nephew call me gomo. There is a tiny minor problem with my sister in law’s husband and me because we don’t know how call each other. I asked relatives but they also didn’t know what is the right title for each other. So sister in law’s husband and me don’t call each other or avoid the situation that have to call each other. It’s kind of awkward. Moreover ,in case of woman, if a woman get married and have a baby, she is going to lost her name. then , she just call ‘mom’ or ‘baby’s mom’. I think mom feel happy when someone call baby’s mom’. As going old, people likes calling their title that shows the authority. I think calling title looks sometimes prescriptive. But it’s our long history culture.
You're right. And I even make my son call 'emo' to my friends. I know this case is also fun.^^

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