ODB 4 Instructions

This is where Jason's ICC students should come to post their fourth homework assignment.

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In your opinion, which best explains the relationship between language, culture, and perception?

The Strong Form of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
1
14%
The Weak Form of the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis
6
86%
 
Total votes: 7

ICC eunjeong
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:46 am

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICC eunjeong » Wed Apr 20, 2011 5:23 am

ICC wonhee wrote:I'd like to mention about different verbalism way which is answer with a YES or NO in a same situation between english and korean. At first, let me show you this following dialogue. This is from my own experience when I was australia.

Stranger : Do you speak Japanese.
I : I am sorry I don't speak Japanese. (I thought he mistook me as a Japanese)
Stranger : Oh, you are not a Japanese?
I : Yes (i meant that Of course, I am not, so I urgently said “yes”)
Stranger : Oh, you must be Nisei then.
(Finally, I realize that I confused yes and no answer.)
I : I am sorry I amn't Japanese.
Stranger : What..? (He looked really puzzled. Then I explained again what I meant)

I am sure that you know what I want to say whit this simple dialogue. As you know, when the Stranger asked me that "you are not a Japanese?". I had to say "No" in english. But in korea, for this question, we must say "Yes" it's totally opposite way of answer. Maybe you also have similar experience.
I try to explain and think of this difference. The answer is unclear but one thing I can say that in english, whether questioners ask positive or negative question, respondents always respond from the standpoint of individual. And in korea, respondents should keep their attention to give correct answer until questioners finish their talking.

As you know, especially, when someone ask using a transitive verb ‘mind’, it is usually confusing to answer with ‘yes’ or ‘no’ . Someone ask to you, ‘Would you mind open the window?’(in Korean, 창문 좀 열어도 될까요?) What do you answer? If you don’t care whether he or she open the window, you should say ‘Of course not’ (it means ‘네, 그러세요.’), instead of saying ‘yes’ (it means ‘아니, 안돼요.’). It is fun, isn't it?

ICC eunjeong
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:46 am

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICC eunjeong » Wed Apr 20, 2011 5:58 am

ICCseonhee wrote:I'd like to talk about `한(恨)'-HAN.
For knowing about `恨', we need to explore our historical background. First of all, our people suffered from the pain of losing the country due to numerous wars. Secondly In the past women were suppressed and unfairly differentiated by the male-centered Confucian culture. Lastly in a hierarchical society of the past, lots of commoners were suffered from the tyranny of the yangban(nobleman). For such reasons(such as the sorrow of parting, the grip of poverty, the anger for reality..) our people felt a kind of resentment, hard feeling, regret and sorrow. But It's not a simple emotion it's very complicated. It's the `恨' that expressed in terms of a word.So how can we express or translate the `恨' to English?
We can see the emotion of `恨' in our literatures such as nobles, poems and even though folk songs.The folk song `Arirang' embobies the sorrow of our people. but in that case, the sorrow is enough to express what the song says? It's `恨' to be more precise...
Is it possible to understand `恨' for English?^^

Although I am Korean, it is difficult for me to explain ‘í•œ(Han)’ or ‘ì •(Jeong) which Steve already mentioned in English or even Korean. But I can feel these emotions because I am rightly Korean.^^ I mean they are unaccountable emotions, but you can feel these emotions from the bottom of your heart.

ICCseonhee
Posts: 22
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 10:08 am

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICCseonhee » Wed Apr 20, 2011 1:28 pm

ICC Jisu wrote:The biggest difference between English and Korean language is surely the order of words in a sentence. In Korean language, we generally have a subject first and a verb at the very end. On the other hand, in an English sentence, a subject and a verb come first and together. I think this means much more than a structural difference. When I talk with my American co-teacher, I can usually get what she's trying to say after listening only the first part of what she's saying, even though it's kind of vague and not exact. But talking with Korean friends or Korean co-teachers is quite different. I have to pay full attention to them because they're likely to say something really important at the end. I am just thinking that is because Korean people want to keep listeners' attention until they finish talking. However, in American way of speaking, probably, they show more regards to their listeners. Again, I feel more curious about whether this aspect of language affected our thought or our way of thinking affected our word order.
In fact I thought your theme as normal at the first time, but after reading your explanation it makes me interested. So far there're many informations about word-order differences between English and Korean(or Chinese and Japanese) but your well-founded explanation is much stronger than others because your arguement includes cultural differences.

ICCdayoung
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Mar 13, 2011 12:25 pm

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICCdayoung » Thu Apr 21, 2011 3:46 am

From the old my country, there is strong camaraderie with pumatyi(품앗이) and Dure(두레). This means that the meeting is to help each other work. Korea emphasize the community spirit, we spend a lot of 'we' words. In Korea, often used the 'we' word. example, our country, our car, our people, our house is often used these 'we' word. By comparison, English speakers spend a lot of the 'I' word, like that my country, my car, my house, my people spend a lot of these 'I' word. It seems even calculate the money. In English, they shared the bill-dutch, but Korean pay rotating. This is a way to hurt someone. The culture of Korea emphasizes divided spirits. There isn't exist that right or not of cultures. Just emphasis is different each.

ICC Jisu
Posts: 28
Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 9:30 am

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICC Jisu » Fri Apr 22, 2011 6:08 am

ICC_MyungYeon wrote:I'd like to talk about korean's unique feeling following the proverb" Turning green with envy( 사촌이 땅을 사면 배가아프다)"
In korea, we have that proverb to expain the feeling once someone is more sucessful than I am . I think it could be used as a positive way. But we-korean do not use it as that way. We-korean usually use it as a negative way. Even we-korean congraturations on someone's sucess . Also at the same tme, we could have other feeling like envy and jealousy. I think we-korean are expressing the congraturation indirectly &ironically.
But I am not sure how to expain if foreiners ask me that proverb. Becasue there is some feeling deepliy insdie I can not expain, maybe korean know it ^^;;
How can I expain that in English?? :?:


Yes, I agree with your point. Koreans are not good at showing their feelings, especially good things like complimentig and blessing. I don't think I can explain that proverb well enough to western people.

ICC wonhee
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2011 8:12 am

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICC wonhee » Fri Apr 22, 2011 6:28 am

ICC_MyungYeon wrote:I'd like to talk about korean's unique feeling following the proverb" Turning green with envy( 사촌이 땅을 사면 배가아프다)"
In korea, we have that proverb to expain the feeling once someone is more sucessful than I am . I think it could be used as a positive way. But we-korean do not use it as that way. We-korean usually use it as a negative way. Even we-korean congraturations on someone's sucess . Also at the same tme, we could have other feeling like envy and jealousy. I think we-korean are expressing the congraturation indirectly &ironically.
But I am not sure how to expain if foreiners ask me that proverb. Becasue there is some feeling deepliy insdie I can not expain, maybe korean know it ^^;;
How can I expain that in English?? :?:
I think to explain this proveb as a negative way, jealousy is more suitable rather than envy. And that felling might be based on hating them.
And i found that begrudgery is another word for jealousy. ex) i begrudge him his good fortune or sucess.

ICCdayoung
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Mar 13, 2011 12:25 pm

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICCdayoung » Fri Apr 22, 2011 7:25 am

ICC wonhee wrote:I'd like to mention about different verbalism way which is answer with a YES or NO in a same situation between english and korean. At first, let me show you this following dialogue. This is from my own experience when I was australia.

Stranger : Do you speak Japanese.
I : I am sorry I don't speak Japanese. (I thought he mistook me as a Japanese)
Stranger : Oh, you are not a Japanese?
I : Yes (i meant that Of course, I am not, so I urgently said “yes”)
Stranger : Oh, you must be Nisei then.
(Finally, I realize that I confused yes and no answer.)
I : I am sorry I amn't Japanese.
Stranger : What..? (He looked really puzzled. Then I explained again what I meant)

I am sure that you know what I want to say whit this simple dialogue. As you know, when the Stranger asked me that "you are not a Japanese?". I had to say "No" in english. But in korea, for this question, we must say "Yes" it's totally opposite way of answer. Maybe you also have similar experience.
I try to explain and think of this difference. The answer is unclear but one thing I can say that in english, whether questioners ask positive or negative question, respondents always respond from the standpoint of individual. And in korea, respondents should keep their attention to give correct answer until questioners finish their talking.
I agree with your opinion. I still answer to this question is often the opposite. You seem more well describe with example. See you soon. :>

ICCdayoung
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Mar 13, 2011 12:25 pm

Re: Too beautiful vs so beautiful !

Post by ICCdayoung » Fri Apr 22, 2011 7:29 am

ICC steve wrote:I still misuse those expressions very often. Why? We Koreans are so used to the expression "너무".
In the Korean language, we can use 너무 as "too ~", or "so~". Since that word "너무" has two meanings, we are very often confused about its usage
For example, when you see a really beautiful woman, you are likely to say "too beautiful". In this context, you intend to say how beautiful she is in a typical Korean way of thinking. However, in English, we will definetely expect some negative things to follow the expression"too beautiful" . In brief, while we can use 너무 positively or negatively, there is a distinctive difference between "too beautidful" and "so beautiful" in the English language.
This thing is amazing to hear. I didn't know that 'Too' could have a negative meaning. Thanks to you.

ICCwonhee
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 8:27 am

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICCwonhee » Fri Apr 29, 2011 2:53 am

I'd like to mention about different verbalism way which is answer with a YES or NO in a same situation between english and korean. At first, let me show you this following dialogue. This is from my own experience when I was australia.

Stranger : Do you speak Japanese.
I : I am sorry I don't speak Japanese. (I thought he mistook me as a Japanese)
Stranger : Oh, you are not a Japanese?
I : Yes (i meant that Of course, I am not, so I urgently said “yes”)
Stranger : Oh, you must be Nisei then.
(Finally, I realize that I confused yes and no answer.)
I : I am sorry I amn't Japanese.
Stranger : What..? (He looked really puzzled. Then I explained again what I meant)

I am sure that you know what I want to say whit this simple dialogue. As you know, when the Stranger asked me that "you are not a Japanese?". I had to say "No" in english. But in korea, for this question, we must say "Yes" it's totally opposite way of answer. Maybe you also have similar experience.
I try to explain and think of this difference. The answer is unclear but one thing I can say that in english, whether questioners ask positive or negative question, respondents always respond from the standpoint of individual. And in korea, respondents should keep their attention to give correct answer until questioners finish their talking.

ICCwonhee
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 8:27 am

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICCwonhee » Fri Apr 29, 2011 2:56 am

ICC_MyungYeon wrote:I'd like to talk about korean's unique feeling following the proverb" Turning green with envy( 사촌이 땅을 사면 배가아프다)"
In korea, we have that proverb to expain the feeling once someone is more sucessful than I am . I think it could be used as a positive way. But we-korean do not use it as that way. We-korean usually use it as a negative way. Even we-korean congraturations on someone's sucess . Also at the same tme, we could have other feeling like envy and jealousy. I think we-korean are expressing the congraturation indirectly &ironically.
But I am not sure how to expain if foreiners ask me that proverb. Becasue there is some feeling deepliy insdie I can not expain, maybe korean know it ^^;;
How can I expain that in English?? :?:
I think to explain this proveb as a negative way, jealousy is more suitable rather than envy. And that felling might be based on hating them.
And i found that begrudgery is another word for jealousy. ex) i begrudge him his good fortune or sucess.

ICCwonhee
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2011 8:27 am

Re: ODB 4 Instructions

Post by ICCwonhee » Fri Apr 29, 2011 2:57 am

ICC kyoung a wrote:The meaning of 'Gi' in Korea.
As you know, most families have only one child and they don't scold them, because it's killing their Gi. Then, what is a Gi? According to a korean dictionary, 'Gi' means active energy which includes strength, signs, physical life and power. In the west, people have the outlook of believing what can actually be seen, so, Gi is very unfamiliar in terms of westerners. But in the east, people carry great interest in Gi and it becomes a part of their lives through various studies. Although the origin and the notion of Gi hasn't been scientifically proved, the evidence of Gi phenomenons is being developed. In my opinion, to koreans, Gi doesn't have a clear meaning .It has become a part of their lives. Can you feel my Gi ?^^*
I have found a sentence on internet related with Gi(qi). " In martial arts movies, a person who has built up a lot of qi[life energy] can even fly." So if someone built up a lot of qi, we say that he get a hight nei-gong. It is very difficult to explain it. I learned a lot of words related with Gi in martial arts novel such as 혈맥(血脈 : ways which Gi flow inside the body not just vascular), 일주천(circulating Gi following 혈맥(血脈) to improve nei-gong). and 주화입마(走火入魔), I can explain it could somebody try to explain it?^^

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